Category Archives: Shop Works

Office Roubo at the finish line

Assembled workbench prior to final top sanding and finishing.

The leg-to-top joinery was checked and declared ready to go. Once dry assembled, I trimmed the tenons with hand saw and re-verified fit. Final sanding and pre-finish applied to base components, the underside and edges of the top. 

The workbench was assembled in my office to avoid squeezing through doors and obstructions our home offers. Once knocked together the top received final sanding and two (or was it three?) coats of oil/varnish finish.

Base for tool cabinet showing half-lap joinery

The bench is not glued together so it may be knocked apart in the future. Should be solid enough for my endeavors. Friction and gravity will be sufficient.

My intent and plan (at least at some point in the design process) was for the existing tool cabinet to rest on the stretchers. However, somewhere along the way that objective was lost. The cabinet was not deep enough to rest on the stretchers. So I had to create a new base. Cut up an old Philippine Mahogany desk to create a simple base using half lap joinery. This base is (mostly) hidden from view. 

That my friends, is a wrap.

Office Roubo Top Mortises

Base positioned on top to mark mortise locations

With the top glued up and dog holes bored, it was time to make the through mortises for the legs and base assembly. The base is assembled (no glue) and held square with clamps. 2x4s were half lapped as temporary upper stretchers to eliminate possibility of legs splaying. The half laps matched the lower stretchers.

The base is positioned on the top (underside) and leg tenons (and dovetails) marked. First up were the rectangular mortises. Chisel v-cuts avoided blow out when the boring waste. I used a 3/8-inch boring bit to drill multiple holes halfway down, then flipped the top and drilled from the other direction. After boring, a mortise chisel cleaned out bulk of remaining waste followed by wider chisel to clean up edges.

After cuts with backsaw a mortise chisel makes quick work of the waste.

The dovetail slots were cut just shy of the boundary line and then relief cuts made in the waste area. Those cuts made chopping bulk of waste an easy and fun process. A wide chisel pared to the angled lines, followed by combination of chisel and route plane to create a flat and perpendicular surface. Test fitting, followed by tweaking kept me entertained and challenged.

Office Roubo Top Prep

Glue up three sections

The top will be about 2-3/4 inches thick, 21 deep and 37 long. Made laminates from 8/4 cherry. After milling, I glued up in three section for easier handling. Dog holes were bored then the sections were glue together. I attempted to keep them well-aligned at glue up to minimize further flattening. Result was close enough that sanding with ROS took care of ridges.

Hand saw work

I trimmed the ends with hand saw. For the first side I used a batten, but not with satisfactory results. Even with a guide (batten) there is a learning curve … which I have not mastered, obviously. Required considerable, tedious chisel cleanup. The other side I drew my guideline and another AVOID GOING THIS FAR OFF line 1/16 inch inside the real line. Sawed to the line with reasonable results. 

Next up, mortises for leg assembly.