Category Archives: For the Home

Cherry Spatula

cherry spoon & spatula
cherry spoon & spatula

After stirring the pot with my cherry wooden spoon, it was so terribly sad to then use a plastic spatula for mushroom and onion sautee work. So I went back to the workshop and my scrap pile.

Found the cherry remnants of the spoon project and sketched out a spatula-shape. Cut rough shape at band saw, then refined using rasps and finish sanding. A few coats of thinned poly and my wooden spoon has a new brother.

 

Cherry Spoon

Cherry spoon on cherry and walnut, end-grain cutting board
Cherry spoon on cherry and walnut, end-grain cutting board

I have followed Peter Follansbee’s blog for some time as I enjoy photos of his work as well as those of the birds he spots on his daily journeys. I am not particularly interested in creating 16-17th century style pieces, but there is much to be learned and inspiration to be gained. His spoon carving posts have a strong appeal to me. Makes me want to give that a go.

Lacking readily available green wood, carving knives and a proper axe I felt stuck, until I saw a Paul Seller’s video on creating wooden spoons with common bench tools. Hey, I should do that. I like the look of spoons cut with a sharp knife, but this would let me explore size, shape, grain flow and with good fortune, give me a spoon to stir my pot.

carving the bowl
carving the bowl

I drew a basic shape on a hunk of (kiln-dried) cherry, then at the band saw made a very rough shape. Stayed far from the drawn lines as I wanted to have options as I proceeded. Then I dished out a bowl using gouges. I have one bent gouge, but found I was able to work with straight gouges just as well for the depth I was working. The challenge is dealing with the change of grain flow at the lowest part of the bowl.

Once I had made some progress on the bowl, I removed more material with a bow saw, back saw and gouges. One of my back saw cuts went further than I wanted. The result is a bit of a flat on the underside which can be felt when fondling the spoon, but visually is not noticeable.

I continued shaping with gouges and rasps. Once a pleasing shape was achieved, I returned to the bowl and made it deeper and a bit wider. I finished up the bowl with card scraper and sanding. A Buhl-diamond was carved in the handle.

Follansbee spoon
Follansbee spoon

The result is pleasing in appearance if you can abide the chunky look. It sure doesn’t have the refined look of a cut spoon such as the Peter Follansbee creation shown here, but it is a beginning.

As a man of many sayings says, “beginnings are important.”